10 Common Family Concerns When Caring for Aging Parents.

The challenges of aging not only affect the older adult but also concerned families and professionals. Having a Life Care Manager on your side will help you address current and/or future issues that often arise.

1) Living at a distance.

Problems:

  • Getting a call from a concerned neighbor stating, “Something is wrong” or “You have to do something.”
  • Getting conflicting information from family, friends, or doctors.
  • Not being able to travel to your parent at a moment’s notice.
  • Frustration with coordinating medical appointments and other needed services from afar.

Solution:

A Life Care Manager can be the point of contact for families at a distance. Not only will he/she take care of all aspects of the senior’s care—socialization, getting to appointments, and being there for emergencies—the Life Care Manager will keep the family up to date every step of the way.

2) Take away car keys?

Problems:

  • Respecting the senior’s dignity versus keeping him/her safe?
  • Is this uncertainty normal? Should I be concerned?
  • To whom can I turn for help?

Solution:

Because a Life Care Manager has years of experience and training, they know the challenges of dementia care and how to handle the behaviors. A Life Care Manager provides expert support not only to the senior but all involved. This gets everyone on the same page, leading to a better care experience.

3) Did Dad take his pills?

Problems:

  • How can I ensure greater compliance with taking medications?
  • Do all the MDs know what the other physicians are prescribing?
  • How can I manage ordering and organizing all of these pills?

Solution:

Life Care Managers communicate closely with physicians to ensure that everyone has the same medication information. Most offices allow a Life Care Manager to set up the medication box for the senior. This, along with regular reminders by our at-home caregivers, can ensure medications are taken as intended.

4) Mom sounds so lonely.

Problems:

  • “I wish I knew how to get her out of the house more.”
  • “Could she be depressed?”
  • “She is inviting strangers into her home for coffee.”
  • “Is her judgment impaired?”

Solution:

Socialization is one of the most important benefits of in-home care. The Life Care Manager works to understand the needs and desires of the entire family to learn about the senior’s passions, both past, and present. This includes planning trips, walks, social events, and much more.

5) My family is having disagreements.

Problems:

  • When conflict among siblings presents obstacles to care for parent(s).
  • When families can’t get beyond the conflict.
  • When family members don’t agree on what’s best for their parent.

Solution:

Finding the right path is critical during periods of transition for a senior. Family members with strong and opposing views can benefit from the objective family coaching derived from engaging an experienced individual. Life Care Managers can help families create a care plan and reach consensus to move forward to best serve the senior’s needs.

6) Hospital discharge. What now?

Problems:

  • What questions should I be asking?
  • How can I get information from multiple doctors?
  • How do I get hospital personnel on my care team?
  • How do I arrange for home care?
  • How do I ensure that all resources are in place: equipment, supplies, and medications?

Solution:

Post-hospitalization, a safe transition home is critical and requires attention to multiple tasks in a short period of time. A Life Care Manager will ensure that the details get handled in a professional, timely manner. From home care to medical equipment to medication compliance—we are here to help ensure the best transition home.

7) Family is stretched to the limit.

Problems:

  • I’m not taking care of myself.
  • No relief is in sight.
  • When will it be over?
  • I’m starting to resent others in my life.
  • I want to be the daughter, not the caregiver!

Solution:

Most adult children have many other people vying for their attention: children, spouses, work, friends, and/or parents. Life Care Managers offer family caregivers additional support through home visits, regular communication, escorting seniors to medical appointments, caregiver oversight, and much more. They will make the caregiving experience better for all involved parties.

8) New diagnosis. What’s next?

Problems:

  • What does the diagnosis mean?
  • How will it impact the senior?
  • How will it impact me?
  • What options are available?
  • How do I coordinate and oversee all services/resources?

Solution:

Upon learning about a new diagnosis, you may feel the world will never be the same again. A Life Care Manager partners with families to provide information and resources compassionately. They can take on as much, or as little, as you would like. They will help coordinate care to achieve a sense of stability.

9) Who says Mom has to move?

Problems:

  • Is a move the best option?
  • What level of care do my parents require?
  • Should they move in with me?
  • How will I manage all of the logistical tasks?
  • What if my family member(s) will be resistant?

Solution:

Families want to do the right things for their loved one. Life Care Manager’s comprehensive, professional home care assessment gets at the needs and preferences of all involved and gives families the tools to understand the situation and appropriate care options. It supports them in making the best decisions.

10) My parent is resistant to care.

Problems:

  • Mom needs care. How can I get her to accept that?
  • Is Mom in denial?
  • What is Mom’s reason for not wanting care? Cost? Loss of control?
  • Does Mom have a hard time taking direction from her adult child?

Solution:

Life Care Managers understand seniors’ underlying concerns. Each situation is unique, and Life Care Managers are experienced and well equipped in their approach to addressing their in-home care needs. Sometimes it takes an outside geriatric care professional to help families realize their options and obtain the care needed in a positive, non-threatening manner.